Elite college allowed sex predator dad to roam campus freely, failed to secure dorm: suit

If Sarah Lawrence officials and security had enforced the college’s no-pet policy, they could have broken up Lawrence “Larry” Ray’s on-campus sex cult, a federal lawsuit alleges.

If security questioned why a 50-year-old man was the only person in a sophomore dorm when his burnt meal set off a fire alarm, victims could have been saved from Ray’s multimillion-dollar sex trafficking scheme, according to the lawsuit.

Instead, Ray remained on campus while he manipulated, groomed and sexually abused students while depriving them of food and sleep.

“Lawrence Ray made minimal effort to conceal his existence at Sarah Lawrence College,” a lawsuit filed by three victims says. “While residing at Sarah Lawrence College, Ray freely entered and exited the grounds, without being noticed or approached by staff or security.”

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Three survivors of Ray’s abuse sued New York-based Sarah Lawrence College in federal court in late November, alleging officials and security failed to protect them despite knowing “something was awry.”

Parents, other students and community members brought concerns about students’ health and well-being to the dean, but the college “did nothing to investigate or intervene,” the lawsuit alleges. 

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“Despite the clear warning signs that something was awry in the Slonim Woods dormitory, Sarah Lawrence College teachers, faculty, staff and security failed and/or refused to notice or take any corrective action or intervene,” the legal action alleges. 

“Plaintiffs’ claims stem from the severe sexual abuse, physical abuse, psychological abuse, human trafficking and forced labor our clients endured as a result of defendants’ actions and inactions, causing them irreparable harm, pain and suffering.”

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Ray, now in his mid-60s, was convicted in April 2022 on several federal charges connected to this disturbing case, including sex trafficking, extortion and forced labor of college-age people, among others. 

He was sentenced to 60 years in prison last year. 

SARAH LAWRENCE COLLEGE TRAFFICKER LARRY RAY ‘TOOK SADISTIC PLEASURE IN THEIR PAIN’

Lawyers for Sarah Lawrence College didn’t immediately respond to Fox News Digital’s request for comment but told several news outlets the college had no knowledge of Ray’s illicit activities. 

“(Ray) committed heinous crimes for which he has properly been held responsible, convicted and sentenced,” the college said in a statement in response to the lawsuit. 

“We hope that sentencing has brought some resolution to Ray’s victims, for whom the college has deep sympathy. We will not comment on any aspect of this litigation, beyond noting that we believe the facts will tell a different story than the unproven allegations made in the complaint that has been filed.”

Still, questions remain about how a man who recently finished a stint in prison for kidnapping was able to move into his daughter’s dorm room with other sophomores in the fall of 2010 for a “temporary stay” and move around campus without being questioned, according to the lawsuit. 

That “temporary stay” became years, and his brainwashing influence seized control of his victims as his scheme became more intricate. He was “building an army” through coercion and manipulation. 

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Security and officials seemingly ignored his presence when he chased a cat all over campus or when he was alone in a dorm when he burned the food. Then the dean allegedly ignored complaints and concerns, according to the lawsuit. 

Claudia Drury, who testified during Ray’s trial, said he forced her into prostitution.

“They failed us so badly,” Drury told The New York Times. “There was a predator living in our dorm, and they did nothing.”

More than 85% of Sarah Lawrence’s 1,700 students live at the school, where annual tuition is $63,128, The New York Times reported. 

The plaintiffs are seeking unspecified damages for their pain and suffering, health care costs and lost potential income.

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